Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Creatures on the Loose #10 - Bernie Wrightson art, Jack Kirby reprint


Creatures on the Loose v1 #10, 1971 - Continuing from the mystery series Tower of Shadows, this title would primarily feature fantasy tales and Atlas monster reprints from the 1960s. King Kull makes his first appearance in this issue, becoming Marvel's second sword and sorcery hero after Conan the Barbarian. Bernie Wrightson does an admirable job with his Marvel premiere, employing a variety of techniques different from his DC works of the same era. His drawings are looser, bolder, and incorporate more complex backgrounds. This story was later reprinted in black and white in Savage Tales #2. A Jack Kirby reprint from Tales to Astonish #21 fills out the rest of the book. This is number 1 of 1 Creatures On The Loose issues with Wrightson art and/or covers. See today's posts or more Wrightson, Kull or Creatures on the Loose issues. See also this blog's Kirby checklist, Wrightson checklistTop 10 Wrightson comics or an alternate cover for this issue.
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"The Skull Of Silence" Wrightson story pencils, 7 pages = ****
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Creatures On The Loose v1 #10 marvel 1970s bronze age comic book page art by Bernie Wrightson
Bernie Wrightson
Find on ebay: >this issue >Kirby >Wrightson >Creatures On The Loose

More Wrightson posts:
Chamber of Darkness #7
Swamp Thing v1 #5 1970s bronze age dc comic book cover art by Bernie Wrightson
Swamp Thing #5
House of Mystery #201


More Kirby posts:
Fighting American v1 #6 harvey comic book cover art by Jack Kirby
Fighting American #6
Omac v1 #5 dc bronze age comic book cover art by Jack Kirby
Omac #5
Captain America v1 #112 marvel comic book cover art by Jack Kirby
Captain America #112

1 comment:

  1. I bought the comic in 1971, and the cover has always been a bit of a puzzle. It has the initials "TS" which rules it out as a Marie Severin solo effort. GCD suggests that "TS" stands for "Trimpe/Severin," although another contributor to GCD suggests "Tom Sutton" as a possibility. I've always seen it as a Sutton cover. Again, it's a bit of a puzzle, because I don't recall Sutton doing covers for Marvel during that period, while Trimpe and Severin were staffers and utility players at that time. Still, I have to go with Sutton, because the pencils don't seem anything like Trimpe, and both the pencils and inks do seem like Sutton to me.

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