Wally Wood
Strange Worlds v1 #4, 1951 - Two Wally Wood tales stand out from the rest of the issue, as the artist displays a unique  talent for the genre. In "The Vampires of the Void" starring Kenton of the Space Patrol, Wood gets an assist from Joe Orlando. His inking does fine up until the final few pages. "The Lost Kingdom of Athala" is far better in its aesthetic die to Wood's pencils and inks. His figure drawings and layouts are unpolished but noticeably unique. Both stories were later reprinted in >Strange Planets #9. Wood's cover, with its emphasis on the female form, is one of his best of the era. Other artists in this issue include George Tuska. This is number 3 of 5 Strange Worlds issues with Wood art and/or covers.
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Wood cover pencils and inks = *****
Wood inside front cover pencils and inks (black and white) = **
"The Lost Kingdom of Athala" Wood story pencils and inks 7 pages = ***
"The Vampires of the Void" Wood story pencils and inks (Joe Orlando pencils and inks) 8 pages = **


Wally Wood
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Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-man v2 #50, 1981 - This well-designed cover places multiple figures in just the right places to convey depth. The duality of Peter Parker and Spider-man is a technique Frank Miller (and others) used often and works well in this case. For a commemoration of Spectacular Spider-man's 50th issue, one could do far worse. Other artists in this issue include John Romita Jr. and Jim Mooney. This is number 5 of 12 Spectacular Spider-man issues with Miller art and/or covers.
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Miller cover pencils ( Josef Rubinstein inks) = ***

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Magnus Robot Fighter v1 #10, 1965 - The madman Xyrkol returns, unleashing his sky-borne Octo-Rob to topple city skyscrapers. Like previous issues, Russ Manning fills this futuristic world with inventive technologies and architecture. The most impressive scenes show the widespread panic among the masses (pages 1-4) and the newly arrived mysterious visitors (see interior page below). The shorter Aliens tale has less flair and excitement but meets expectations nonethless. This is number 10 of 21 Magnus Robot Fighter issues with Manning art and/or covers (not including reprints).
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"The Mysterious Octo-Rob" Manning story pencils and inks 24 pages = ***
"Fear of the Unknown"
Manning story pencils and inks 4 pages = ***

Magnus Robot Fighter v1 #10 gold key silver age 1960s comic book page art by Russ Manning
Russ Manning
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Famous Funnies v1 #169, 1948 - Featuring a variety of genres from humor to science fiction, this series had quite a lengthy run during the golden age. Al Williamson's only contribution are two small illustrations for a western crime story. His figure drawing is admirable, but the compositions are relatively flat. On the second page (see interior page below), the background shadow is too prominent and poorly executed. Still, Williamson's action-oriented style is evident in this early work. Other artists in this issue include Clifford McBride. This is number 2 of 2 Famous Funnies issues with Williamson art and/or covers. 
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"Hi-Jack Junction" Williamson text illo pencils and inks 2 pages = *

Al Williamson

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Creepy v1 #123, 1980 - As the plague ravages through Europe and takes his wife, Victor Polideri suffers further from the violent murders of each one of his relatives. On the opening page, Alex Toth's inks are minimally applied. Subsequent pages become more forceful as the tale progresses. His inking is dark and heavy, creating stark contrasts between light and shade (see interior page above). The page layouts benefit directly from the improved designs. This is one of Toth's few inking assignments that nonetheless demonstrate a seasoned hand. Other artists in this issue include Carmine Infantino, Dan Adkins, Martin Salvator and Alfredo Alcala. This is number 13 of 15 Creepy issues with Toth art and/or covers (not including reprints).
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"Kiss of the Plague" Toth story inks (Leo Sommers pencils) 6 pages (black and white) = ***

Alex Toth
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Jack Kirby
Fantastic Four v1 #17, 1963 - Continuing from the previous issue, Doctor Doom kidnaps the blind sculptress Alicia Masters as the FF furiously searches for him. The cover's multi-paneled approach sounds good in concept, but Jack Kirby's drawings are less precise in execution. His layouts inside are fairly conservative, but his visuals are varied enough to be interesting. This is number 17 of 116 Fantastic Four issues with Kirby art and/or covers.
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Kirby cover pencils (Dick Ayers inks) = **
"Defeated by Doctor Doom” Kirby story pencils (Dick Ayers inks) 22 pages = ***

Jack Kirby
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Nick Fury and his Agents of S.h.i.e.l.d. v1 #4, 1973 - Two Nick Fury tales are reprinted from the 1960s, both by a young Jim Steranko. Lacking in reproduction quality, I'd suggest the buying the originals instead: Strange Tales #152 and #153. The cover is reprinted from the latter issue.

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Joe Kubert

Blackhawk v1 #245, 1976 - Lacking the impact of Joe Kubert's previous effort, this cover seems hurriedly done. Detail and shading are relegated to the main figure, but the remaining visual elements are treated as an afterthought. Other artists in this issue include Dan Spiegle. This is number 2 of 2 Blackhawk issues with Kubert art and/or covers.
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Kubert cover pencils and inks = **

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Forbidden Worlds v1 #1, 1951 - In this commonly themed golden age story, a demon is intent destroying the world. Al Williamson's sophisticated pencils are made more dimensional due to Frank Frazetta's sensual inks. The demon is aggressively brutish, made more so by the brushstrokes of his body hair. Although each artist has his own distinctive approach, their styles seem to work together seamlessly. Other artists in this issue include Paul Reinman and Emil Gershwin. Cover by Ken Bald. This is number 1 of 8 Forbidden Worlds issues with Williamson art and/or covers and number 1 of 2 Forbidden Worlds issues with Frazetta art and/or covers.
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"Demon of Destruction" Williamson story pencils / Frazetta story inks 10 pages = ***

 Al Williamson / Frank Frazetta
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Fantasy Masterpieces v2 #14, 1980 - This title reprints the first >Silver Surfer series by Stan Lee and John Buscema. Later on, early Warlock stories by Jim Starlin were added as a supplement. This particular issue contains a reprint from Warlock #11.

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Beware the Creeper v1 #2 dc 1960s silver age comic book cover art by Steve Ditko
Steve Ditko
Beware the Creeper v1 #2, 1968 - The criminal activities of Proteus, a master of disguise, runs afoul of the Creeper. Steve Ditko's second issue continues with the same artistic verve as the first. The hero's agility and acrobatics are amply displayed in the numerous fight scenes, each choreographed with dynamism and grace. The artist humorously attempts to integrate a DC billboard into the storyline (page 21) but falls flat. That aside, the majority of pages are passionately drawn and detailed, including Ditko's superbly nightmarish cover. This is number 2 of 6 Beware the Creeper issues with Ditko art and/or covers.
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Ditko cover pencils and inks = ****
"The Creeper" Ditko story pencils and inks 24 pages = ****

Beware the Creeper v1 #2 dc 1960s silver age comic book page art by Steve Ditko
Steve Ditko
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Solar Man of the Atom v1 #4, 1991 - Amazingly, Dr. Seleski makes a miraculous discovery after his exposure to intense radiation. Solar's origin story continues, exquisitely drawn by Barry Windsor Smith. Quieter scene eventually lead to a radiant climax, as the hero gives a demonstration of his newfound powers. There's some question as to whether Smith pencilled part of the issue's main feature story, perhaps a handful of panels. I choose to withhold judgment for now. Each story contains a different two-page illustration on the center spread, when combined with the others from subsequent issues, forms a giant panoramic panel. Other artists in this issue include Don Perlin. This is number 4 of 11 Solar issues with Smith art and/or covers.
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"Alpha and Omega part 4" Smith story pencils (Bob Layton inks) 6 pages = ****
Center spread Smith story pencils (Bob Layton inks) 2 pages = ***
Barry Windsor Smith
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Korg 70,000 BC v1 #1, 1975 - No John Byrne art in this issue, despite what some comic book price guides say. The artist's work does appear in Korg #2. If you like caveman-themed comics, check out Bernie Wrightson's work on Kong the Untamed. Other artists in this issue include Pat Boyette.

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Walt Simonson
X-Factor v1 #11, 1986 - Navigating through underground tunnels toward headquarters, Iceman, Beast, Leech and Caliban are attacked by the Morlocks.Walt Simonson begins to make the series his own with a dynamic approach to both drawing and layout. The opening splash is especially good, depicting the Morlocks emerging from the shadows deep underground. Simonson's cover employs a centralized figure, used to full effect. This is number 2 of 27 X-Factor issues with Simonson art and/or covers.
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Simonson cover pencils and inks = ***
"Redemption" Simonson story pencils (Bob Wiacek inks) 23 pages = ***

Walt Simonson
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Walt Disney's Donald Duck / Four Color Comics v2 #108, 1946 - After purchasing a houseboat, Donald and crew voyage down the Ohio river and encounter a mythical sea serpent. Unusually, the story begins in duotone (black and red) on the inside front cover. The tale progresses in full color with Carl Barks' delightful artwork throughout. Some later pages are crowded with dialogue and some panels confine the large scale of the sea serpent, but in general the pacing and sequencing are well managed. Two more stories follow the main feature, one about a talented, escaped seal and the other a disturbing tale of Donald's pyromania. Barks' artwork on both is quite skillful, but "The Firebug" is far more visually enticing. Similar to the front of the book, "Seals Are So Smart" continues as a duotone on the inside back cover and ends in full color on the back. This is number 4 of 43 Donald Duck issues with Barks art and/or covers (not including reprints).
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"The Terror of the River" Barks story pencils and inks 28 pages = ***
"
The Firebug" Barks story pencils and inks 13 pages = ***
"Seals Are So Smart" Barks story pencils and inks 10 pages = ***

Donald Duck Four Color Comics #108 - Carl Barks 1940s dell comic book page art
Carl Barks
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