Thunder Agents v1 #7 tower silver age 1960s comic book cover art by Wally Wood
Wally Wood
T.h.u.n.d.e.r. Agents v1 #7, 1966 - Noman drops from an impressive height, stopping a car full of armed thugs. Accurate foreshortening makes this Wally Wood cover more exciting and credible. Inside, the artist delivers two terrific stories. On the first, Dynamo turns fugitive after being framed by the Iron Maiden. The opening splash shows the hero hiding in a sewer, made filthier by Wood's small touches. The second tale tells of Menthor's abduction by the Subterraneans. Aside from a single dramatic splash, the remaining pages are comprised of small exquisitely drawn panels. Both stories meet Wood's standards and expectations. Also, the issue contains no Steve Ditko art, regardless of what comic guides say. This Tower silver age issue includes artwork by Mike Sekowsky, George Tuska, John Giunta and Sal Trapani. This is #7 of 18 Thunder Agents issues by Wood (sans reprints). Related: Wood gallery
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Wood cover pencils and inks = ***
"Suspicion of Treason"
Wood story pencils and inks 10 pages = ***
"A Matter of Life and Death"
Wood story pencils and inks 10 pages = ***
Iron Maiden
portrait, Wood pencils and inks 1 page = ***

Thunder Agents v1 #7 tower silver age 1960s comic book page art by Wally Wood
Wally Wood
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Doctor Strange #169
Doctor Strange v1 #169 (#1), 1968 - Continuing the numbering from Strange Tales, this first issue begins the Sorcerer Supreme's first self-titled series. His origin from ST #110 is also retold for the first time, further expanding upon it. These include his initial encounters with both the Ancient One and Baron Mordo. This Roy Thomas story for Doctor Strange was drawn by Dan Adkins, cover art by Adkins. Notes: key 1st issue, 1st self-titled series
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"The Coming of Doctor Strange" 20 pages

Doctor Strange #169
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Two-Gun Kid #30
Two-Gun Kid v1 #30, 1956 - A fearless gunfighter suddenly meets a man he doesn't dare shoot. Even in this brief story, Al Williamson draws better than most of his peers. His opening splash depicts the cocky gunfighter heavily draped in shadow. The painterly background and large areas of black serve to heighten the drama. Frequent collaborator Angelo Torres does his usual fine job, adding spontaneity to Williamson's dynamic pencils. This Atlas issue includes artwork by Chuck Miller, cover art by Joe Maneely. This is #2 of 3 Two-Gun Kid issues by Williamson.
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"Afraid of No Man" Williamson story pencils (Angelo Torres inks) 4 pages = ***


Al Williamson
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Carl Barks
Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge v1 #67, 1967 - Carl Barks nears the end of his long run on this title, giving way to reprints earlier in the series. In this issue, both cover and the story "The Fabulous Philosopher's Stone" come from Uncle Scrooge #10.

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Love Romances #75
Love Romances v1 #75, 1958 - A pretty waitress must choose between a dashing millionaire and her truck driver boyfriend. Matt Baker's layouts on this short story are straightforward, with little to no flourish. Still, his delicate linework and fluid brushstrokes enhance each page. Baker's sensitive renditions stand out. This golden age Atlas issue includes art by Vince Colletta, John Forte and Jay Pike, cover art by Colletta. This is #4 of 12 Love Romances issues by Baker (sans reprints). 
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"He's Rough, But I Love Him" Baker story pencils and inks 5 pages = ***

Matt Baker
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Marvel Team-Up #1
Marvel Team-Up v1 #1, 1972 - Featuring Spider-man and the Human Torch, this premiere issue begins a long-running series of team-ups. Various characters in the Marvel universe would be paired up with Spidey, except for a handful of exceptions with the Human Torch. Although two-person team-ups were plentiful at DC (Brave and the Bold and World's Finest), this was Marvel's first title dedicated to the concept. A second team-up series featuring the Thing (Marvel Two-in-One) would debut a year later. This Roy Thomas story for Marvel Team-Up was drawn by Ross Andru and Mike Esposito, cover art by Gil Kane and Frank Giacoia. Notes: key 1st issue
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"Have Yourself a Sandman Little Christmas" 21 pages

Marvel Team-Up #1
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Western Outlaws v1
Fox
1948-49

17-21

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Western Outlaws v2
Atlas
1954-57

1
2-8
9 - Kubert art
10
11 - Williamson art
12
13 - Baker art
14 - Williamson art
16
17 - Williamson art

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Weird War Tales v1 #5 dc bronze age comic book cover art by Joe Kubert
Joe Kubert
Weird War Tales v1 #5, 1971 - Previously containing reprints, Weird War Tales begins inserting more original works. Joe Kubert sets the tone with an eerie, astral projection-themed cover (note that the name on the ghost's uniform references fellow artist Neal Adams). Alex Toth makes his debut on the title, deftly illustrating the framing pages (see interior page below). Gritty and raw, his artwork perfectly bookends the stories. This issue includes art by Russ Heath. This is #1 of 3 Weird War Tales issues by Toth and #5 of 51 Weird War Tales issues by Kubert
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Kubert cover pencils and inks = ***
Toth
framing pages pencils and inks 5 pages = ***

Weird War Tales v1 #5 dc bronze age comic book page art by Alex Toth
Alex Toth
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Star Spangled War Stories #43
Star Spangled War Stories v1 #43, 1956 - One of Joe Kubert's early works for the series, he chronicles a day of trench warfare during World War I. Told from the perspective of a frightened soldier, the scenes are capably drawn, sequenced and laid out. Kubert's detail and textural effects seem to parallel the soldier's fear and anxiety. This story was later reprinted in >Our Army at War #204. This issue includes artwork by Russ Heath, cover art by Jerry Grandenetti. This is #3 of 96 Star Spangled War issues by Kubert (sans reprints). 
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"Trench Battle" Kubert story pencils and inks 6 pages = ***

Joe Kubert
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Daredevil v1 #44 marvel 1960s silver age comic book cover art by Jim Steranko
Jim Steranko
Daredevil v1 #44, 1968 - Gene Colan's style clearly dominates this Daredevil cover, especially the Jester's face leering in the background. Still, Jim Steranko's inks enhance many of the finer details. Daredevil and the surrounding buildings benefit from his sharp delineations. Steranko mostly inked his own pencils, making this issue somewhat of a rarity. This issue includes story art by Gene Colan and Tom Palmer. This is #1 of 1 Daredevil issues by Steranko (sans reprints). 
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Steranko cover inks (Gene Colan pencils) = ***

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Famous First Edition #C-28
Famous First Edition v1 #C-28, 1974 - Oversized and captivating, this DC bronze age superhero treasury reprints Detective Comics #27. As comic book collecting gained steam, DC allowed fans to experience the closest thing to owning a golden age gem. These issues preceded the DC Archive Editions by decades.

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Jim Starlin
Defenders v2 #110, 1982 - Replicating the story's opening scene, the cover portrays the Devil-Slayer trapped in the Negative Zone. Jim Starlin, known for his creative renditions of outer space (among other things) places the characters against a backdrop of colorful planets. Concisely laid out, the reader's eye follows an almost circular path from figure to figure. Although this is his sole effort on the regular series, Starlin also contributed to both Giant-Size Defenders #1 and #3. This issue includes art by Don Perlin, Mike Esposito. This is #1 of 1 Defenders issues by Starlin (sans reprints).
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Starlin cover pencils and inks = ***

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Amazing World of DC Comics #7
Amazing World of DC Comics v1 #7, 1975 - Focused on Superman and his history in comics and other media, the numerous articles should be enough to delight any fan. Neal Adams supples the Superman art for the back cover, superimposed against a photograph. It's not one of his better efforts compared to other works in the same era. This issue includes art by Curt Swan, cover by Swan. This is #1 of 1 Amazing World of DC Comics issues by Adams (sans reprints).
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Adams back cover pencils and inks = **

Neal Adams
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Conan the Barbarian v1 #23 marvel comic book cover art by Barry Windsor Smith
Conan the Barbarian #23




Conan the Barbarian v1 #23, 1973 - Pursued by a winged swordsman known as the Vulture, Conan finds allies himself with Red Sonja, a fellow mercenary. An abundance of small panels fill Barry Smith's layouts, making them appear more crowded and convoluted. Dan Adkins does a fine job delineating the opening splash, but fellow inkers Sal Buscema and Chic Stone do little to enhance Smith's pencils. This Roy Thomas story was originally intended for Conan #22. This issue includes cover art by Gil Kane. This is #21 of 22 Conan issues by Smith (sans reprints). Notes: key 1st appearance Red Sonja. Related: Smith gallery.
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"The Shadow of the Vulture" Smith pencils (Dan Adkins, Sal Buscema and Chic Stone inks) 20 pages = **

Conan the Barbarian v1 #23 marvel comic book page art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
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"Join the Stampede Roundup"
Lone Rider Televiewer comic book ad, 1950s - Most likely a plastic box with a roll of pictures inside, seen through a plastic magnifying eyepiece. No batteries or electricity required and claims to last a lifetime. Nice rip-off of the Lone Ranger though. Published in Captain Science #1.

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