Star Wars v1 #50, 1981 - Commemorating the fiftieth issue, this the first super-sized comic of the series. Like his previous Star Wars works, Al Williamson delivers some his best pages of the period. His first 15 pages (which he pencils and inks) are breathtakingly good, but his remaining 16 pages (his pencils, Tom Palmer inks) are less impressive. Walt Simonson steps in to pencil the last 8 pages and provides the cover. His own unique approach is sadly, mostly buried underneath the inks. Interestingly, Williamson appears to have inked the final two pages. This is number 6 of 7 Star Wars issues with Williamson art and/or covers (not including reprints) and This is number 4 of 18 Star Wars issues with Simonson art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Simonson cover (Tom Palmer inks) = *
"The Crimson Forever" Williamson story pencils (Williamson, Tom Palmer inks) 31 pages = ****
"The Crimson Forever" Simonson story pencils (Rick Bryant, Dave Simons, Williamson inks) 8 pages = *

Al Williamson
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Simonson / Williamson / Star Wars
>this issue >Simonson >Williamson >Star Wars

Walt Disney's Comics and Stories v1 #308, 1966 - Much to Daisy's surprise, Donald Duck opens his own high-end beauty parlor. As his success and reputation grow, his girlfriend feels more insecure. Carl Barks delights his readers with Donald's creative process and the wild hairdos that result from it. His most compelling scene is the arrival of Mrs. J. Crowsfoot Dryskin, a wealthy old crone in need of a makeover. This story was later reprinted in >Daisy and Donald #1. Other artists in this issue include Paul Murry.
- - - - - - - - - -
"The Beauty Business" Barks story pencils and inks 10 pages= ***

Carl Barks
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Barks / Walt Disney's Comics and Stories
>this issue >Barks >Walt Disney's Comics and Stories

Eerie v3 #11, 1967 - An already famous knight and his squire enter the dragon's lair, intent on gaining immortality. Jeff Jones' artwork is graphic and simplified. His layouts boldly combine framed and unframed panels for effect. Alas, some of his forms are obscure and confusing, melding the dragon with the cavernous interiors. Neal Adams, by contrast, submits a beautiful ink and wash portrait of the Minotaur on the inside front cover (this was later reprinted in >Eerie #22). The last notable story is "The Mummy", a Wally Wood effort first published in Monster World #1. Other artists in this issue include Joe Orlando and Tom Sutton. This is number 3 of 5 Eerie magazine issues with Adams art and/or covers and number 1 of 1 Eerie magazine issues with Jones art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"No. 10: The Minotaur" Adams story pencils and inks 1 page (black and white) = ***
"To Slay a Dragon" Jones story pencils and inks 6 pages (black and white) = **


Neal Adams
Jeff Jones
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Adams / Jones / Wood / Eerie
>this issue >Adams >Jones >Wood >Eerie

Star Spangled Comics v1 #113, 1951 - Though a mix of diffferent genres fill this issue, the lead feature belongs to Tomahawk, a colonial-era adventurer. His latest challenge: stop the villainous Black Cougar from robbing the area's wagon trains. Frank Frazetta nicely captures the rough-hewn feel of the frontier era. The outdoor scenes are open and spacious, populated with individualized characters. Most memorable is the opening splash (see interior page below), showing the Black Cougar eyeing his victims from above. His figure and horse are beautifully cloaked in shadow, with just enough highlights for definition. This story was later reprinted in Tomahawk #139. This is number 1 of 1 Star Spangled Comics issues with Frazetta art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"The Black Cougar" Frazetta story pencils and inks 10 pages = ***
 

Frank Frazetta
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Frazetta / Star Spangled Comics
 >this issue >Frazetta >Star Spangled Comics

New Romances v1 #14, 1952 - This issue's "Smart Talk" advises teenage girls not to be gold diggers. Alex Toth illustrates this single page with the care and draftsmanship of his longer stories. Fine details are retained by inker Mike Peppe, down to the montage on the final panel. Other artists in this issue include Art Saaf. This is number 3 of 8 New Romances issues with Toth art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
" Smart Talk" Toth story pencils (Mike Peppe inks) 1 page = ***

Alex Toth

 - - - - - - - - - -
Home / Toth / New Romances 
>this issue >Toth >New Romances
Queen of the West Dale Evans v1 #8, 1956 - Accused of murder, a man stands trial while a jury determines his fate. Dale Evans must first ensure an angry mob doesn't get to him first. Russ Manning opens with a large, roomy panel that seems a bit too spare. Subsequent pages are crowded with far too many elements. Several individual panels are hampered in the same way. Though showing no lack of effort, Manning's story art suffers from poor sequencing and composition. Other artists in this issue include Hi Mankin. This is number 6 of 15 Queen of the West Dale Evans issues with Manning art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"Trial and Error" Manning story pencils and inks 16 pages = **

Russ Manning
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Manning / Queen of the West Dale Evans 
>this issue >Manning >Queen of the West Dale Evans
Iron Man v1 #56 marvel comic book cover art by Jim Starlin
Jim Starlin
Iron Man v1 #56, 1972 - A modern day Rasputin brings to life a monstrous statue in Central Park, inevitably drawing the attention of Iron Man. Unfortunately, Jim Starlin shows more enthusiasm than skill on his third effort on the title. Indistinct faces and stiffly positioned figures populate the story. A dramatic full splash (page 22) is marred by poor foreshortening. Despite some innovative layouts, Starlin's characters (with the exception of Iron Man) appear unintentionally comical. This is number 3 of 6 Iron Man issues with Starlin art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Starlin cover pencils (Frank Giacoia inks) = ***
"Rasputin's Revenge" Starlin story pencils (Mike Esposito inks) 20 pages = **

Iron Man v1 #56 marvel comic book page art by Jim Starlin
Jim Starlin
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Starlin / Iron Man
>this issue >Starlin >Iron Man
Daredevil v1 #50 marvel 1960s silver age comic book cover art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
Daredevil v1 #50, 1969 - A robotic threat from Star Saxxon proves more than a challenge for Daredevil. Curiously, his foe is mis-colored on the cover and has a somewhat different costume than the inside. The first of several issues by Barry Smith, his artwork is representative of his earliest efforts for Marvel. His emulation of comics veteran Jack Kirby is obvious, but primitive and poorly drawn. The cover layout mostly fails to elicit excitement or interest. Smith's only saving grace is his interior pages, which display a youthful enthusiasm. Kudos to inker Johnny Craig, who does his best to add polish and clarity. This is number 1 of 6 Daredevil issues with Smith art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Smith cover pencils (Johnny Craig? inks) = *
"If In Battle I Fall"
Smith story pencils (Johnny Craig inks) 20 pages = **

Daredevil v1 #50 marvel 1960s silver age comic book page art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Smith / Daredevil
>this issue >Smith >Daredevil
Tor v2 #2 dc bronze age comic book cover art by Joe Kubert
Joe Kubert
Tor v2 #2, 1975 - A large masthead leads the eye down toward Tor's rescue of a woman from an oncoming dinosaur. Joe Kubert's layout is typical of his bronze age covers: arresting and entertaining at the same time. This issue reprints the untitled lead Tor story and Danny Dreams back-up from One Million Years Ago #1. This is number 2 of 6 Tor v2 issues with Kubert art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Kubert cover pencils and inks = ****

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Kubert / Tor
>this issue >Kubert >Tor

Yellow Claw v1 #4, 1957 - The short-lived crime series ends with this issue. As with the previous two issues, Jack Kirby contributes four terrific stories. Unlike the previous issues, Kirby's pencils are finished by colleague John Severin. Though differing in style, the artistic pairing results in an unusual, but fascinating look. The artwork is more intricate in detail and has a pleasantly surprising dimension and depth. As far as I know, their complementary talents have never been combined other than this occassion. Other artists in this issue include Manny Stallman and John Severin (cover). This is number 3 of 3 Yellow Claw issues with Kirby art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"The Living Shadows" Kirby story pencils (John Severin inks) 5 pages = ***
"The Skreemies" Kirby story pencils (John Severin inks) 5 pages = ***
"Five Million Sleepwalkers" Kirby story pencils (John Severin inks) 4 pages = ***
"The Thought Master" Kirby story pencils (John Severin inks) 5 pages = ***

Yellow Claw v1 #4 atlas crime comic book page art by Jack Kirby
Jack Kirby
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Kirby / Yellow Claw
>this issue >Kirby >Yellow Claw
Carl Barks
(Walt Disney's) Christmas Parade v3 #1, 1988 - Stories from earlier Christmas Parade issues comprise the bulk of this one hundred page edition. Most prominent among these is "You Can't Guess", a Carl Barks tale from Christmas Parade #2. This issue also boasts a fine Carl Barks cover painting, based on Walt Disney's Comics and Stories #148. Notice the minute, but interesting changes from the original.
- - - - - - - - - -
Barks cover painting = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Barks / Christmas Parade
>this issue >Barks >Christmas Parade

What If (Nova Had Been Four Other People?) v1 #15, 1979 - In the first of four separate stories, a woman's husband dies due to a petty thief. When suddenly given the power to become Nova, she embarks on a senseless rampage. Walt Simonson's art rarely asserts itself, allowing Bob Wiacek's inks to take over the look and feel. Even the pacing and page layouts show little effort or interest. Other artists in this issue include John Buscema, Joe Sinnott, Carmine Infantino, Ross Andru and Frank Giacoia. This is number 1 of 1 What If? issues with Simonson art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Untitled first story Simonson pencils (Bob Wiacek inks) 8 pages = *

Walt Simonson
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Simonson / What If
>this issue >Simonson >What If

Boris Karloff Tales of Mystery v1 #21, 1968 - One of Jeff Jones' earliest works, this short story of a cursed, jewel-studded skull is simply disappointing. A knowledge of basic anatomy is sorely lacking and the overall layouts are poorly planned. His depiction of series host Boris Karloff is amateurish at best. Thankfully, his work would improve exponentially and would far exceed this early effort. Other artists in this issue include Bill Draut and Luis Domingez. This is number 1 of 1 Boris Karloff issues with Jones art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"The Screaming Skull" Jones story pencils and inks 3 pages = *

Jeff Jones
- - - - - - - - - -
HomeJones / Boris Karloff
>this issue >Jones >Boris Karloff

True Tales of Love v1 #22, 1956 - Skipping outings and vacations with friends, Beth and Ricky prudently save their money to start a new life as man and wife. Matt Baker captures the excitement and newness of a whirlwind romance in his imagery. His second page (see interior page below) is especially good, using shadows to full effect. Note how panel three's painterly method adds a dream-like quality. Other artists in this issue include Vince Colletta and Jay Scott Pike. Cover by Vince Colletta. This is number 1 of 1 True Tales of Love issues with Baker art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"No Regrets" Baker story pencils and inks 4 pages = ***

Matt Baker
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Baker / True Tales of Love
>this issue >Baker >True Tales of Love
Joe Kubert
Our Army at War v1 #97, 1960 - Positioned in a farm house in the country, Sgt. Rock and Easy Company gets hit from all sides. Joe Kubert replicates the scene on the opening splash, with far better results. His story pages are gritty and nicely detailed throughout. Some panels, like the grenade throwing scene below, stand out on their own due to the strength of their design. This story was later reprinted in >Our Army at War #190. Other artists in this issue include Mike Esposito.
- - - - - - - - - -
Kubert cover pencils and inks = **
“What Makes a Sergeant Run?” Kubert story pencils and inks 13 pages = ***

Joe Kubert
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Kubert / Our Army at War
>this issue >Kubert >Our Army At War
Frank Miller
Star Trek v2 #10, 1981 - Surrounded by barbaric aliens, Spock is left to his own defense on this non-attributed Frank Miller cover. Although typically strong at figure drawing, the artist has the hero's body twisting awkwardly in different directions. That aside, Miller seems to suggest the Vulcan's more vicious side by placing his foot on top of his foe's bleeding wound. Other artists in this issue include Leo Duranova and Klaus Janson. This is number 2 of 2 Star Trek issues with Miller art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Miller cover pencils (Klaus Janson inks) = **

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Miller / Star Trek
>this issue >Miller >Star Trek
Batman v1 #234 dc comic book cover art by Neal Adams
Neal Adams
Batman v1 #234, 1971 - Batman's old adversary Two-Face returns, looking for a hidden cache of gold doubloons. His golden age-era origin from Detective Comics #66 is retold, along with his incarceration, re-introduction into society and return to crime. The villain's maniacal, oversized face is prominently displayed on Neal Adams' cover. The story pages are adeptly drawn and laid out, focusing on the two main characters. The ending is anti-climactic, but Adams' opening splash of the Batman crouching in a swamp is eerily compelling. This story was later reprinted in Best of DC #14. Other artists in this issue include Carmine Infantino, Joe Giella and Irv Novick.
- - - - - - - - - -
Adams cover pencils (Dick Giordano inks) = ***
"Half an Evil" Adams story pencils (Dick Giordano inks) 15 pages = ***

Batman v1 #234 dc comic book page art by Neal Adams
Neal Adams
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Adams / Batman
>this issue >Adams >Batman
Al Williamson
Vanguard Illustrated v1 #3, 1984 - Not atypically for the artist, Al Williamson submits a compelling science fiction cover with all the usual themes. Spacemen, damsels, extra-terrestrials, weaponry and alien landscapes come together in a deftly drawn composition. While unrelated to any interior story, the theme is quintessentially Williamson. Other artists in this issue include Steve Rude, Brendan McCarthy and Tom Yeates. This is number 1 of 1 Vanguard Illustrated issues with Williamson art and/or covers. 
- - - - - - - - - -
Williamson cover pencils and inks = ****

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Williamson / Vanguard Illustrated
>this issue >Williamson >Vanguard Illustrated