Jim Starlin
Rampaging Hulk v1 #5, 1977 - Jim Starlin's cover is nicely painted overall, but the Hulk's large cartoon-like face takes some adjusting to. The monster glares at the regal Sub-mariner, standing amidst crashing waves that are meticulously rendered. This finely illustrated area helps offset the otherwise stark image. Starlin's composition is deceptively simple but well executed. Other artists in this issue include Keith Pollard, Alfredo Alcala, Val Mayerik and Bob Wiacek. This is number 2 of 3 Rampaging Hulk issues with Starlin art and/or covers.
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Starlin painted cover = ***

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Joe Kubert
Tarzan of the Apes v1 #223, 1972 - Reunited with his true love Jane Porter, Tarzan must plan their escape from the fabled City of Opar. Joe Kubert concludes his adaptation of The Return of Tarzan with boldness. His double-page spread features a ritual of human sacrifice, dramatically lit and composed. The artist re-uses some of his panels from the previous issue, but not to the detriment of the artwork. Kubert's use of a silent panel perfectly suits Tarzan and Jane's long-awaited reunion (see interior page below). This is number 16 of 43 Tarzan issues with Kubert. and/or covers (not including reprints).
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Kubert cover pencils and inks = ***
"
The Pit of Doom" Kubert story pencils and inks 18 pages = ***

Joe Kubert
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Chamber of Darkness v1 #4, 1970 - Trying out the sword and sorcery theme, Marvel introduces Starr the Slayer as a prototype to Conan the Barbarian. Barry Smith's drawings are turbulent yet distinctive. What the artwork lacks in polish, he makes up for in exciting and kinetic layouts (see interior page below). This story was later reprinted in Conan #16. Jack Kirby's tale of a lonely hermit is a fine example of visual storytelling. Pages are purposefully drawn and sequenced, including the graphically churning opening splash. This Kirby tale was later reprinted in Giant-size Chillers v2 #3. Other artists in this issue include Tom Sutton and Marie Severin (cover). This is number 1 of 2 Chamber of Darkness issues with Kirby art and/or covers and number 2 of 2 Chamber of Darkness issues with Smith art and/or covers.
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"The Sword and the Sorcerers" Smith story pencils and inks 7 pages = ***
"The Monster" Kirby story pencils (John Verpoorten inks) 7 pages = ***

Barry Windsor Smith
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Barnyard Comics v1 #13, 1947 - A jealous pig, a helpful sparrow and an impolite pig are the main characters of three separate Frank Frazetta tales. His illustrations for these text stories are lively, though not as well detailed as his other work on the series. "The Grateful Bear" is the artist's best drawing compositionally, partially due to its lack of a confining frame around the characters.  This is number 2 of 16 Barnyard Comics issues with Frazetta art and/or covers. Other artists in this issue include Jack Bradbury.
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"The Goldfish and the Sparrow" Frazetta text illo pencils and inks 1 page = ***
"The Flying Pig" Frazetta text illo pencils and inks 1 page = ***
"The Grateful Bear" Frazetta text illo pencils and inks 1 page = ***

Frank Frazetta
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Marshall Rogers
Shadow of the Batman v1 #1, 1985 - Reprinting key Batman issues from the bronze age, this issue features the Dr. Phosporus storyline by Walt Simonson (Detective #469 and Detective Comics #470). Marshall Rogers supplies a brand new wrap-around cover. The portraiture on the back is a bit dull, but the overall drawing works best when shown in its entirety. Inside, a Rogers gem from House of Mystery #274 completes the book. This is number 1 of 5 Shadow of the Batman issues with Rogers art and/or covers.
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Rogers wrap around cover pencils and inks = ***

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Swamp Thing v1 #12 1970s bronze age dc comic book cover art by Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo
Swamp Thing v1 #12, 1974 - Traveling through different eras in time, the Swamp Thing encounters the same man at each juncture. Nestor Redondo's first cover for the series is skillfully composed and beautifully drawn. His story pages contain the same high level of draftsmanship, from the dinosaur's reptilian skin on pages 1-4 to the lions of ancient Rome on page 7 (see interior page below). Most impressive is the painstaking detail he infuses on nearly every page. This is number 2 of 13 Swamp Thing issues with Redondo art and/or covers.
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Redondo cover pencils and inks = ****
"The Eternity Man" Redondo story pencils and inks 20 pages = ****

Swamp Thing v1 #12 1970s bronze age dc comic book page art by Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo
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Walt Disney's Comics and Stories v1 #370, 1971 - Combining new and reprinted material, the main Carl Barks story was originally published in Walt Disney's Comics and Stories #142. Other characters featured in this issue include Mickey Mouse.

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Jack Kirby
X-Men v1 #16, 1966 - After discovering the Sentinels' underground lair, the X-men become prisoners of this rogue robotic army. Jack Kirby's cover displays appropriate scale but lacks excitement. His interior layouts are barely followed by Jay Gavin, resulting in less than compelling illustrations. This is number 16 of 17 X-Men issues with Kirby art and/or covers (not including reprints).
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Kirby cover pencils (Dick Ayers inks) = **


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Planet of the Apes v1 #2, 1974 - Wrongly accused of murder, a human named Jason and his chimpanzee friend Alex must avoid capture at all costs. Mike Ploog continues his pencil and wash technique, with pleasing results. Ploog's depiction of the characters and this post-apocalyptic world is viscerally entertaining. Like the previous issue, there are photos and interviews from the Planet of the Apes movies. Other artists in this issue include George Tuska, Mike Esposito and Bob Larkin (cover). This is number 2 of 10 Planet of the Apes issues with Ploog art and/or covers.
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"The Forbidden Zone of Forbidden Terror" Ploog story pencils and inks 25 pages (black and white) = ****

Planet of the Apes v1 #2 curtis magazine page art by Mike Ploog
Mike Ploog
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Luke Cage, Power Man v1 #42, 1977 - Hired to protect a gold shipment, Luke Cage now stands accused of its robbery. Lee Elias' newspaper-strip style doesn't quite work on this super-hero title. Alex Nino's inking typically dominates, and usually to the benefit of the artwork. Nino's hand is evident on some panels more than others, but generally ineffective. This is compounded by the fact that the two artistic approaches seem less than compatible. Other artists in this issue include Ron Wilson (cover). This is number 1 of 2 Power Man issues with Nino art and/or covers.
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"Gold! Gold! Who's Got the Gold?" Nino story inks (Lee Elias pencils) 17 pages = **

Alex Nino
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Don Newton
Teen Confessions v1 #90, 1975 - Unlike his previous romance cover, Don Newton seems to struggle with the painted medium. The couple's faces (especially the woman) are overworked with color. The background trees and distant city lights elicit more interest than the foreground figures. The layout is basic, minimal and generally lackluster. Newton would do better on Charlton's adventure and horror titles. This is number 2 of 2 Teen Confessions issues with Newton art and/or covers.
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Newton
painted cover = *

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Neal Adams
Deadman v1 #21985 - Printed on Baxter paper, this series re-presents the first Deadman stories from the late 1960s. Almost all feature Neal Adams art, some of his earliest works for DC comics. The cover is Adams' new interpretation of one of the climactic scenes. Specifically, this edition reprints stories from House of Secrets #85 (first half), #207 and #208. This is number 2 of 3 Deadman issues with Adams art and/or covers (not including reprints).
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Adams cover pencils and inks = ***

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Korak Son of Tarzan v1 #2, 1964 - Coming to the aid of shipwrecked passengers, Korak must fend off a gang of river pirates. Russ Manning's clean, crisp drawings add clarity to the storytelling. The rising squall and subsequent abandonment of a yacht (pages 3-4) are among the best scenes. Careful pacing and deft page layouts display Manning's skill and experience. In the second tale, Korak rescues an African water buffalo and ends up befriending him. This is number 2 of 12 Korak issues with Manning art and/or covers.
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"Panic on the Beach" Manning story pencils and inks 18 pages = ***
"The Fury of Go-Zan" Manning story pencils and inks 9 pages = ***

Korak Son of Tarzan v1 #2 gold key silver age 1960s comic book page art by Russ Manning
Russ Manning
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Joe Kubert
Ragman v1 #5, 1977 - This final installment of the Ragman saga circles back to his place of origin from the first issue. Joe Kubert, who co-created the character with Robert Kanigher, takes on all of the artistic responsibilities this time. While his cover is merely adequate, Kubert's interior illustrations are simply stunning. A wide horizontal panel spans the first two-page spread, beautifully depicting the Ragman in his gritty, urban environment. His origin is briefly retold before a new story and fresh characters emerge. Powerfully drawn throughout, the finest scenes present the hero at his most vengeful (see interior page below). This is number 5 of 5 Ragman issues with Kubert art and/or covers.
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Kubert cover pencils and inks = ***
"Untitled"
Kubert story pencils and inks 17 pages = ****

Joe Kubert
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Frank Miller
Frank Miller was apparently slated to do Dr. Strange during the early 1980s, according to this superbly drawn ad. Alas, for whatever reason, it never came to be. Can anyone shed some light on this?

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The Sandman v1 #4 dc bronze age comic book cover art by Jack Kirby
Jack Kirby
The Sandman v1 #4, 1975 - The super-heroic fantasy series allows for many surrealistic landscapes and creatures. Jack Kirby illustrates them all with relish. Certain scenes appear to have been inspired by Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, but executed in the artist's own unique way. Kirby's cover continues the theme of an endangered sleeping innocent, but seems annoyingly repetitive by the fourth issue. The first several pages, with their large panels and additional details, comprise the artistic highlights. This is number 4 of 6 Sandman issues with Kirby art and/or covers.
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Kirby cover pencils (Mike Royer inks) = ***
"Panic in the Dream Stream"
Kirby story pencils (Mike Royer inks) 18 pages = ***

The Sandman v1 #4 dc bronze age comic book page art by Jack Kirby
Jack Kirby
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DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest v1 #20 / Dark Mansions of Forbidden Love, 1982 - First published in DC's gothic romance titles, these stories from the early 1970s were short-lived. The best of these is a lenghty Alex Toth tale from Sinister House of Secret Love #3. Other artists in this issue include Mike Kaluta, Val Mayerik and Tony Dezuniga. Cover by Joe Orlando.

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Shock Suspenstories v1 #7, 1953 - Accepting a bribe from a corrupt club owner, a city inspector later realizes he's responsible for the deaths of hundreds during a fire. Wally Wood's smoldering  typography on the title page matches his superb drawings. He's confined by small panels on most pages, but fills each with stunning detail. His dramatic lighting raises the level of shock and tragedy. Other artists in this issue include George Evans, Jack Kamen and Joe Orlando. This is number 6 of 14 Shock Suspenstories issues with Wood art and/or covers.
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"The Bribe" Wood pencils and inks 7 pages = ****

Wally Wood
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>this issue >Wood >Shock Suspenstories