Devil Dinosaur #1 - Jack Kirby art & cover + 1st appearance

Devil Dinosaur #1 marvel 1970s bronze age comic book cover art by Jack Kirby
 Jack Kirby
Devil Dinosaur v1 #1, 1978 - One of Jack Kirby's most ridiculed titles of 1970s, an early human called Moon Boy partners with a fearsome T-Rex called Devil Dinosaur. The artwork is far better than most people expect. His eclectic style is well suited to themes of historical science-fiction. Kirby's cover seems hurried, but he compensates with a jarring two-page spread toward the front of the book. One of his signature innovations, the explosive scene provides an exciting start to the series. This is 1 of 9 Devil Dinosaur issues by Kirby. /// key 1st appearance Devil Dinosaur, Moon Boy, 1st issue
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Kirby cover pencils (Mike Royer inks) = **
"Devil Dinosaur and Moon Boy" Kirby story pencils (Mike Royer inks) 17 pages = ***


Devil Dinosaur #1 marvel 1970s bronze age comic book page art by Jack Kirby
 Jack Kirby
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Devil Dinosaur #1 - Jack Kirby art & cover + 1st appearance Devil Dinosaur #1 - Jack Kirby art & cover + 1st appearance Reviewed by Ted F on 12:25:00 PM Rating: 5

4 comments:

  1. You know, I'm a huge Kirby fan but I've always avoided Devil Dinosaur for some strange reason. Never seemed my cup of tea and plus I've never been keen on Kirby's late 70's Marvel work.

    Heck, I also avoided Kamandi for the same unexplainable reason, but ended up loving it after getting the first issue off eBay last week.

    Maybe I'll give Devil Dinosaur a shot.

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  2. Kamandi was Kirby's longest running DC title, so it's safe to assume it had a large following at the time. The art on the last half of the run starts to decline, but I still found it enjoyable. What's ironic is how much better his work was during his migration back to Marvel in the mid 70s. Early issues of Black Panther, 2001, and Devil Dinosaur were surprisingly good (DD stories were pretty silly). His Machine Man and Captain America issues around the same time were weaker than the above. For a real treat, check out his run on Our Fighting Forces (mid 1970s), all of which have been reviewed here.

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  3. I guess a more historically accurate book featuring late Pleistocene fauna like “Devil Mammoth” or “Devil Saber-toothed Tiger” would have had less appeal.

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  4. anachronisms, schmanacronisms...

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