Ronin v1 #4 dc comic book cover art by Frank Miller
Frank Miller
Ronin v1 #4, 1984 - The traditional samurai delves deep into the Manhattan sewers, searching for someone of personal importance. Frank Miller's cover is the weakest of the series, but his interiors continues to dazzle. Forty plus pages (including five double page spreads) demonstrate a mastery of storytelling. Among the highlights are the techno-organic army on pages 10-11 and the clever film strip sequence on pages 44-45. Most compelling perhaps is the minimalist but powerful scene of slow, encroaching darkness (pages 21-22). This is number 4 of 6 Ronin issues with Miller art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Miller wrap around cover pencils and inks = **
Miller story pencils and inks 48 pages = ***

Ronin v1 #4 dc comic book page art by Frank Miller
Frank Miller
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Miller / Ronin
>this issue >Miller >Ronin
Matt Baker
The Texan v1 #5, 1949 - Buckskin Belle meets a handsome tenderfoot in the opening story by Matt Baker. The artwork is nicely done, although the inker is unknown to me. The first page is better than the rest, depicting the city slicker's attempt at taming a wild horse. This story was later reprinted in the Hawk #10. Baker's cover is a tad better, although an embrace occurring during a gunfight seems odd. Note that the cowboy's hat is shot clean off, heightening the tension. This is number 2 of 11 Texan issues with Baker art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Baker cover pencils and inks = ***
"Peril on the Prairie"
Baker story pencils 9 pages = ***

Matt Baker
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Baker / Texan
>this issue >Baker >Texan
Daredevil v1 #50 marvel 1960s silver age comic book cover art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
Daredevil v1 #50, 1969 - A robotic threat from Star Saxxon proves more than a challenge for Daredevil. Curiously, his foe is mis-colored on the cover and has a somewhat different costume than the inside. The first of several issues by Barry Smith, his artwork is representative of his earliest efforts for Marvel. His emulation of comics veteran Jack Kirby is obvious, but primitive and poorly drawn. The cover layout mostly fails to elicit excitement or interest. Smith's only saving grace is his interior pages, which display a youthful enthusiasm. Kudos to inker Johnny Craig, who does his best to add polish and clarity. This is number 1 of 6 Daredevil issues with Smith art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Smith cover pencils (Johnny Craig? inks) = *
"If In Battle I Fall"
Smith story pencils (Johnny Craig inks) 20 pages = **

Daredevil v1 #50 marvel 1960s silver age comic book page art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Smith / Daredevil
>this issue >Smith >Daredevil
Green Lantern Green Arrow #88 dc comic book cover art by Neal Adams
Neal Adams
Green Lantern v2 #88, 1972 - Like many of DC's 52-page bronze age comics, this issue is comprised mostly of reprints. Neal Adams supplies the montage-like cover (except for the bottom panel), showcasing the two original Green Lanterns. Not among his best efforts, details fall short on the small illustrations. Compensating for this is Adams' exquisite pencil sketch for Green Lantern #89. This rough cover increases anticipation for the next issue. An unpublished golden age tale by Carmine Infantino accompanies the silver age reprints. This is number 14 of 15 Green Lantern issues with Adams art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Adams cover pencils and inks = **
Adams pencils only 1 page = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Adams / Green Lantern
>this issue >Adams >Green Lantern

Marvel Two-in-One v1 #55, 1979 - In part three of the Pegasus Project storyline, Black Goliath enters the fray, donning a new costume and renaming himself Giant-Man. John Byrne delivers yet another capably drawn tale, his last on the series. Joe Sinnott faithfully maintains the integrity of the pencils, while adding crispness and clarity. Quasar and Thundra also make appearances. Other artists in this issue include Keith Pollard and Joe Sinnott (cover). This is number 5 of 8 Marvel Two-in-One issues with Byrne art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"Giants in the Earth" Byrne story pencils (Joe Sinnott inks) 17 pages = ***

John Byrne
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Byrne / Marvel Two-In-One
>this issue >Byrne >Marvel Two-in-One
Swamp Thing v1 #12 1970s bronze age dc comic book cover art by Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo
Swamp Thing v1 #12, 1974 - Traveling through different eras in time, the Swamp Thing encounters the same man at each juncture. Nestor Redondo's first cover for the series is skillfully composed and beautifully drawn. His story pages contain the same high level of draftsmanship, from the dinosaur's reptilian skin on pages 1-4 to the lions of ancient Rome on page 7 (see interior page below). Most impressive is the painstaking detail he infuses on nearly every page. This is number 2 of 13 Swamp Thing issues with Redondo art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Redondo cover pencils and inks = ****
"The Eternity Man" Redondo story pencils and inks 20 pages = ****

Swamp Thing v1 #12 1970s bronze age dc comic book page art by Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Redondo / Swamp Thing
>this issue >Redondo >Swamp Thing


Midget Comics v1 #1 (Fighting Indian Stories), 1950 - An Indian raises his tomahawk to strike, just as another arrives to the rescue (presumably). Matt Baker's cover is capably designed and illustrated, leading the reader's eye from the masthead to the helpless victim. Native American-inspired patterns, icons and hand drawn letters further enhance the cover's appeal. Only two issues were published in this smaller format (about 5x7), both in the western genre. This is number 1 of 1 Midget Comics issues with Baker art and/or covers.
 - - - - - - - - - -
Baker cover pencils and inks = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Baker
>this issue >Baker
Jim Starlin
Luke Cage, Power Man v1 #45, 1977 Jim Starlin's Power Man takes up most of the cover layout, suggesting limited space (and time). His figure has bulk and mass, straining against the chains. His bronze age drawings tend to be slightly cartoonish at times, made more so in this case by the primary color palette. As far as I know, this is Starlin's only rendition of the character. Other artists in this issue include Lee Elias. This is number 1 of 1 Power Man issues with Starlin art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Starlin cover pencils and inks = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Starlin / Power Man
>this issue > Starlin >Power Man

DC Comics Presents v1 #54, 1983 - Superman and Green Arrow take on a polluting corporation in this environmentally themed story. With twenty-three pages, Don Newton has room to vary panel sizes and layouts. His portrait of Superman on the opening splash page is impressive, taking great care in depicting the hero. Throughout the story, other panels (pages 9-10) seem to reinforce this. By comparison, Newton's cover is just satisfactory. This is number 1 of 1 DC Comics Presents issues with Newton art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Newton cover pencils (Dick Giordano inks) = ***
"The Price of Progress" Newton story pencils (Dan Adkins inks) 23 pages = ****

Don Newton
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Newton / DC Comics Presents
>this issue >Newton >DC Comics Presents
Tor v1 #2A st john golden age comic book cover art by Joe Kubert
Joe Kubert
3-D Comics (Tor v1 #2A), October 1953 - Although technically titled "3D Comics", this issue has often been included in comic guides as part of the Tor series. Even more confusing, this is the earlier of two same-numbered issues whose contents differ. Joe Kubert's small cover illustration pales compared to his work inside. Though partially obscured by the 3-D printing effect, there is a high level of effort and detail on all the stories. The scene of a gigantic turtle's attack is one of many exquisitely drawn panels. Other artists in this issue include Russ Heath and Norman Maurer. This is number 1 of 5 Tor issues with Kubert art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Kubert cover pencils and inks = *
Untitled story ("This is the story of man...") Kubert pencils and inks 8 pages = ****
Untitled story ("Why is man able to survive...") Kubert pencils and inks 6 pages = ****
Untitled story ("Imagine Yourself...") Kubert pencils and inks 3 pages = ****
"Danny Dreams" Kubert story pencils and inks 5 pages = ***

Tor v1 #2A st john golden age comic book page art by Joe Kubert
Joe Kubert
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / KubertTor
>this issue >Kubert >Tor
John Byrne
Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-man v2 #17, 1978 - Not long after his stint on The Champions, John Byrne's cover features one of the founding members, the Angel. More visceral than graceful, his artwork comes through despite the domineering masthead and clutter of word balloons. Other artists in this issue include Sal Buscema and Dave Hunt. This is number 1 of 5 Spectacular Spider-man issues with Byrne art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Byrne cover pencils (Joe Rubinstein inks) = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Byrne / Spectacular Spider-man
>this issue >Byrne >Spectacular Spider-man

The Shadow v2 #3, 1973 - A large penitentiary draws suspicion from the Shadow and his team, leading them to the infamous mobster King Cobra. Series artist Michael Kaluta gets a hand from Bernie Wrightson, whose inks significantly enhance the artwork. The opening bank robbery scene (see interior page below) and the exploding prison walls (page 17) are but two of many fine panels. Though their respective styles work well together, few other collaborations come to mind (see House of Mystery #221). Prior to the first Shadow issue, Wrightson also did a stunning promotional ad in several DC issues, including Kamandi #2. This is number 1 of 2 Shadow issues with Wrightson art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"Kingdom of the Cobra" Wrightson story inks (Mike Kaluta pencils) 20 pages = ****

The Shadow v2 #3 - Bernie Wrightson dc 1970s bronze age comic book page art
 Bernie Wrightson
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Wrightson / Shadow
>this issue >Wrightson >Shadow
Nick Fury Agent of Shield v1 #6 1960s marvel comic book cover art by Jim Steranko
Jim Steranko

Nick Fury, Agent of S.h.i.e.l.d. v1 #6, 1968 - By this issue, Jim Steranko no longer illustrates the interiors but manages to produce this outstanding cover. A spacesuit-garbed Nick Fury floats adrift while the Earth explodes in the distance. The rough photographic texture of the moon nicely complements the smattering of stars in the background. Devoid of blurbs or titles, the setting suggests the vast silence of space. Not since the EC comics of the 1950s has a science fiction cover made such an artistic contribution. This is number 6 of 7 Nick Fury issues with Steranko art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Steranko cover pencils and inks = *****

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Steranko Top 10Nick Fury
>this issue >Steranko >Nick Fury